Tony Maher
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MDKB (My Dogs Killed Batman)
Marcel Duchamp explained his creation of his first readymade, bicycle wheel and stool, as being the result of chance. He said it was a way of letting things go and create. The spinning of the wheel on the stool was comforting to Duchamp, something he likened to flames dancing in a fireplace. Duchamp was just acting on his intuition to create something that he felt was interesting by simply placing two objects together. The result was a monumental breakthrough not only for Duchamp himself but for how art can be made, and ultimately what could be considered art.

One day as I walked up the stairs in my 1000 square foot condominium, I was confronted with what came to be a quite Duchampian experience. My two puppies had rummaged through my bookcase tearing out various books and having what seemed to be a very fun time trying to learn to read in a primal manner. Most books were just slightly damaged or simply pulled off the shelves, two in particular where ripped to shreds and left all over my living room floor. For some unknown reason my dogs were drawn to the "Hush" graphic novels, which is my favorite Batman story line.

What was left though was a multitude of various splices of information and juxtapositions that made little to no sense but were nonetheless interesting pieces of art. My dogs made art, and in the most primal and intuitive way, doing so just to have fun and to see what happens. What happened was I laughed very hard, then collected the remains so I could photograph the evidence of how my dogs killed Batman.